transistoradio:

Joan Mitchell (1925-1992), Champs (Black, Gray, and Yellow) (1991-92), colour lithograph, 24 x 30 inches. Via The Style Tonic.

transistoradio:

Joan Mitchell (1925-1992), Champs (Black, Gray, and Yellow) (1991-92), colour lithograph, 24 x 30 inches. Via The Style Tonic.

(Reblogged from jbe200)

haplologic:

untitled, v2, 2014

©auxiliofaux,2012-2014

(Reblogged from beingmemm)
Played 1,044 times

(Source: bohemian-buses)

(Reblogged from huesodecristal)
missjodie:
"I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me, too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you." - Frida Kahlo

missjodie:

"I used to think I was the strangest person in the world but then I thought there are so many people in the world, there must be someone just like me who feels bizarre and flawed in the same ways I do. I would imagine her, and imagine that she must be out there thinking of me, too. Well, I hope that if you are out there and read this and know that, yes, it’s true I’m here, and I’m just as strange as you." - Frida Kahlo

(Source: bellecs)

(Reblogged from innocent-sedated)
(Reblogged from akapearlofagirl)

prints:

The Falling Man is a photograph taken by Associated Press photographer Richard Drew, of a man falling from the North Tower of the World Trade Center during the September 11 attacks in New York City. The subject of the image—whose identity remains uncertain but is speculated to be that of Jonathan Briley — was one of the people trapped on the upper floors of the skyscraper who apparently either fell as they searched for safety or jumped to escape the fire and smoke. At least 200 people fell or jumped to their deaths that day.

Regarding the social and cultural significance of The Falling Man, theologian Mark D. Thompson says that “perhaps the most powerful image of despair at the beginning of the twenty-first century is not found in art, or literature, or even popular music. It is found in a single photograph.”

(Reblogged from frarielikesthis)
(Reblogged from wishflowers)

archatlas:

Saltscapes San Francisco Bay Cris Benton

Benton’s images allow us to slip our earthly bonds and see the world from new heights, his aerial views offering a fresh perspective on familiar landscapes. Surprising and sublime, Saltscapes can be enjoyed equally as a collection of art photography and a portrait of ecological transformation and resilience.”

(Reblogged from m0sca)
(Reblogged from stayanindividual)

thetraumfabrik:

The world’s oldest decorated cave

Lit by the beam from a head-torch, lines of animals loom out of the shadows across the limestone walls of the cave – lions and bears, mammoths, bison and horses, all woven together across the fissures of the rock. And immortalised in the clay, prints of human hands and feet provide a spiritual link to those ancient artists.

An immense natural cathedral untouched for millennia, the Chauvet Pont-d’Arc cave has retained a remarkable freshness. Time stands still here along the Estre Combe at Vallon- Pont-d’Arc in Ardèche, just a short way from the immense natural stone bridge of the Pont d’Arc. On the 18 December 1994, three local cave explorers – Jean-Marie Chauvet, Eliette Brunel and Christian Hillaire – discovered paintings, engravings, and prints that had been forgotten for 36,000 years

(Reblogged from ordinaryfire)